Developers pivot to mass timber for new Downtown apartments

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A developer who plans to build a mid-rise apartment building in Central City near Downtown has submitted new plans that now include mass timber.

The Overland Group switched up its plans a year after requesting permission to build a 12-story apartment building at 336 S. 300 E.

The project height hasn’t changed, but the developers are attempting to build fewer units than previously planned.

While it previously targeted 246 units, with many of them being one-bedrooms, the new version would include 168 total units. It cut out a significant number of studio units from the previous version.

Project Details

  • Micro: 1
  • Studio: 20
  • One-bedroom: 96
  • Two-bedroom: 42
  • 3-bedroom: 9

The building’s ground floor would include private space that primarily serves to hide the building’s parking from public view.

The Lehi-based developers have asked for no rear setbacks as part of their request to build the project.

“The enhanced amenity space that can be provided by allowing a zero setback will make for a much more usable open space for the residents that is safer and will give them a sense of enhanced security,” the developers wrote. “It will also be more aesthetically pleasing and more enjoyable to live there because of the additional open space.”

The building would include space for 125 vehicles, include 85 standard car spaces, 4 tandem spots, 29 spaces for compact cars or motorcycles and 6 ADA spots.

“Making downtown living more convenient makes it possible for families of all types to live there which help to reduce the need for commuting to work and the need for a family to own multiple cars, which helps to reduce the congestion on public roads, air pollution, and also helps make living in the city safer and more enjoyable for pedestrians.”

Email Taylor Anderson

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Posted by Taylor Anderson

Taylor Anderson grew up near Chicago and made his way West to study journalism at the University of Montana. He's been a staff writer for the Chicago Tribune, Bend Bulletin and Salt Lake Tribune. A move from Portland, Oregon, to Salt Lake City opened his eyes to the importance of good urban design for building strong neighborhoods. He lives on the border of the Liberty Wells and Ballpark neighborhoods.