Strong winds turn Worthington Tower into the world’s tallest whistle

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A residential high-rise under construction in Downtown Salt Lake City turned into what may be the world’s largest whistle when strong winds moving through the panels wrapping the parking podium let out a loud and high-pitched sound on Friday.

The the loud noise could be heard from blocks in any direction of the site of the Worthington Tower on the northeast corner of 200 E. 300 S. in the Central City neighborhood.

Neighbors reported contacting the city and county for answers and action as the slats of the podium let out varying pitches throughout the day.

“We live a half block south and have been hearing extremely loud screeching/whistling noises the last few days,” a reader told us. “After calling several city offices, the County Health department says they’ve had many calls/complaints, and it turns out the noise it caused by the wind blowing through the parking structure panels turning the building into the world’s largest whistle.”

Watch the video to hear for yourself.

The 31-story building is set to have 359 apartments ranging from one to three beds. It will top out at 335 feet, placing it within the top 10 tallest in Salt Lake City.

The building is one of two new high-rises that will open for leasing soon. A few blocks northwest, Astra Tower is set to become the tallest building in the state and will begin leasing later this year.

Representatives from Convexity Properties, High Boy Ventures and Timberlane Partners didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on Friday and city and county offices were closed.

Email Taylor Anderson

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Posted by Taylor Anderson

Taylor Anderson grew up near Chicago and made his way West to study journalism at the University of Montana. He's been a staff writer for the Chicago Tribune, Bend Bulletin and Salt Lake Tribune. A move from Portland, Oregon, to Salt Lake City opened his eyes to the importance of good urban design for building strong neighborhoods. He lives on the border of the Liberty Wells and Ballpark neighborhoods.