For sale cottage homes proposed for Sugar House

The proposed lots for the Cottage Court development. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
The proposed lots for the Cottage Court development. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.

Salt Lake City’s for-sale housing stock is limited.  Not only in terms of supply and demand but the limited stock in the city is also older, requiring more upkeep than the typical Salt Lake County home.  The online real estate and rental marketplace,  Zillowranked Salt Lake City as the worst metro area for first-time homebuyers because of the rising home prices and limited housing supply.

Developer Adam Nash, representing Growth Aid LLC and Land Developoment LLC, hopes to build two housing developments near the southern border of Sugar House.  The projects, referred to as Cottage Court and the 27th Street project, are proposed for 3072-3129 S. 900 East and 868 E. 2700 South.  The developers describe the homes as “cottage homes” and the projects will add a combined total of 21 new for sale units to the Sugar House area.

The largest of the two projects, Cottage Court, will include 16 new homes on 1.86-acres that currently includes four homes, three of which are vacant, and a vacant parcel.  The homes will be two stories each and around 3,400 square feet.  The developers will redistribute the five parcels into 16 parcels, each at around 5,000 square feet.

Hamlet Homes will be the builder for both projects and they expect the homes to start at around $375,000.

The developers of Cottage Court are requesting a planned development approval and zoning map amendment to accommodate the project’s smaller lot sizes.

The proposed lots for the 27th Street development. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
The proposed lots for the 27th Street development. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.

The project will include two sets of eight homes that will front a private street accessed from 900 East. The project will be built in two phases with eight homes built in each phase.

“There have been many developments of a high density or highrise nature built and planned recently throughout Sugarhouse but there has been almost no single-family residential subdivision developed during this same time,” wrote Nash in planning documents submitted to the city.

The 27th Street project will be smaller with five proposed homes on 0.6 acres.  The l-shaped project area fronts both 2700 South and 900 East wrapping around a corner property at the 2700 South and 900 East intersection.

The developers of the 27th Street project are requesting a planned development request.  The 27th Street project will have similar home and lot sizes as Cottage Court.  Both developments will feature three styles of homes; Glascow, Cameron and Maxwell.  The homes each include a two-car garage and three to four bedrooms.

The developers will need approval from the Planning Commission for both projects.  Because the Cottage Court will require a zoning amendment, the developers will need to go before the City Council for final approval.

Two other cottage-style developments are underway.  Construction has started on the Jefferson Walkway development, a seven-unit cottage home community in Central Ninth directly east of the 900 South TRAX station.

In the Liberty Wells neighborhood, construction has started on the Living Zenith development, a five-home net zero community on the 1100 South block of 400 East.

*This post has been updated.

Sketch of the Glascow home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
Sketch of the Glascow home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
Sketch of the Cameron home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
Sketch of the Cameron home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
Sketch of the Maxwell home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.
Sketch of the Maxwell home. Image courtesy Sugar House Community Council.

Posted by Isaac Riddle

Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.