More micro units close to the 400 S corridor proposed

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The Planning Commission voted to approve a new project that would deliver primarily micro unit apartments despite some concerns about changes in the Central City neighborhood.

As the 400 South corridor continues to grow out to surrounding streets, the new proposal seeks to add more units to a corner parcel through micro units on Broadway. 

Located on the southeast corner of 600 E. and 300 S. in Central City, Bamboo Housing plans to remove two structures, remodel two others, and build a new multifamily building. The new structures would have 38 microunits at 400 square feet each, one one-bedroom unit, and a remodeled single-family home. 

Currently, the corner lot is the site of a non-conforming historical commercial use within a single-family home. 

The city reviews contributing and non-contributory status internally, with the help of local and state experts.

The building at 602 South was recently remodeled, changing the stucco siding. This means the building is now considered “non-contributing” because the remodel wasn’t authorized. The city found the corner building, 602, to no longer be contributory and approved the removal of it. 

Because the site is within a historic district, the Historic Landmark Commission also needed to vote. The group voted to approve the construction at its November meeting, but not without some hesitation from some members of the public and on the commission.

Some members of the Historic Landmark Commission felt the project contributed well but still lamented losing any structure, contributing or not. Landmark Commissioner Carlton Getz called for the City to review its standards to determine whether structures are contributory or not. 

“While the scale is correct for the area, I would agree that losing the 602 building is a loss for the neighborhood… and a review of the standards of contributory status needs to be done,” Getz said. 

The 602 home that is now “non-contributing” – Photo provided by Thom Jakab

This critique of the regulations comes as members of the public and other commissioners feel there is not enough public knowledge or notice on when these classification changes are being considered or even when they happen for the contributory status of a building.

A member of the public felt this project “is better than any other Central City rebuild, and matches the neighborhood character.” 

Bamboo Housing would also maintain the heights of nearby buildings, planned at three stories. It will include stoops at street level and balconies for all units. There are no other amenities included in the plans. 

 Bamboo Housing is in an RMF-35 zone and required Planning Commission approval to waive the density requirements in order to build the 39 units total. This is allowed through a planned development process since they remove the nonconforming use and replace it with a conforming one (residential). 

The 39-unit complex will only have 12 parking spaces, which is only allowed due to the closeness to the TRAX line and stations. A large indoor bike storage facility will be attached to the one-bedroom unit building.  

If completed, this would be another microunit building close to the 400 S corridor, along with ones like AQUI and 343 on 400 East.

Project details: 

Owner: Bamboo LLC & Sixth East LLC 
Architect: Thom Jakab Architecture + Design

Existing and planned site plans for Bamboo Housing. Provided by Thom Jakab.

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Email Zeke Peters

Editor’s note: This story was updated to accurately reflect the address for the project.

Posted by Zeke Peters

Zeke Peters is a dual-masters student at the University of Utah studying Urban Planning and Public Administration. He works as a planner and designer in Salt Lake City. He currently resides in downtown Salt Lake and is from Austin, Minnesota, the birthplace of SPAM.