Developer backs down from project that would have replaced The Other Place

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The developer that proposed erecting a new apartment building at the site that’s currently home to The Other Place restaurant has withdrawn its application for the project.

An Indiana-based group called Trinitas Ventures had been moving forward with a proposal to build 150 units at 457 E. 300 S., on land that’s home to the iconic Greek diner, with the restaurant owner’s blessing.

The February proposal led to a public outcry from loyal patrons who couldn’t believe the restaurant’s owner had agreed to sell the property and likely shutter the business if the city approved the developer’s plan.

After months of city review, and before a trip to the Planning Commission, Trinitas withdrew its application late last month.

“Trinitas is no longer pursuing approval of this project,” Matt Klinzing, director of development operations at the firm, wrote in an email to the city.

The firm didn’t respond to requests for comment from Building Salt Lake about its decision to back away from the project after four months of city review.

The project that would have replaced The Other Place.

The project would have added 160 units, likely aimed at student housing. The design review application had been reviewed and approved by nearly every necessary division within the city and was set for a trip to the Planning Commission when Trinitas backed down.

The departure leaves in question what’s next for The Other Place, though the owner has previously signaled he intends to keep it running.

The restaurant’s owner, Konstantinos “Kosta” Louras, who owns the land and buildings that Trinitas was planning to develop, opened The Other Place in 1986.

After Building Salt Lake first reported about the Trinitas proposal, Louras told patrons who rushed to the restaurant that the story wasn’t true and that he had no plans to close.

But in emails, Louras confirmed that he was entertaining an offer.

“It’s difficult to provide definitive information until the developer receives approval from the city,” Louras said when asked when he would close his restaurant.

Documents filed with the city also showed that Louras had signed off on Trinitas’ attempt at developing his properties.

“I’m not denying that a developer has expressed interest, but no deal has been approved,” he said. “Until they are, I have no plans to close.”

Time will tell how long that stays the case.

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Posted by Taylor Anderson

Taylor Anderson grew up near Chicago and made his way West to study journalism at the University of Montana. He's been a staff writer for the Chicago Tribune, Bend Bulletin and Salt Lake Tribune. A move from Portland, Oregon, to Salt Lake City opened his eyes to the importance of good urban design for building strong neighborhoods. He lives on the border of the Liberty Wells and Ballpark neighborhoods.