Construction resumes on Sugar House building that was destroyed by October fire

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Construction crews began rebuilding Sugar Alley this week, just under a year after a fire swept through the wood-framed mixed-use building on Highland Drive and destroyed it shortly before it was finished.

Builders started framing on the existing concrete podium, indicating that while the fire burned intensely for days last year, the project wasn’t a total loss.

The fire caused tens of millions of dollars in damage to the building, which already had a restaurant tenant lined up when the fire started overnight on Oct. 26 at 2188 S. Highland Drive.

Developers now say the construction crews will follow the same plans for the building that have already been approved, and that the project will be completed by March 12, 2025.

The lead developer of Sugar Alley is Lowe Property Group, whose headquarters are in the newly built Dixon building a Frisbee throw away.

City fire officials deemed the blaze was caused by either temporary heaters or an electrical box and was fueled by plenty of oxygen flowing through the unfinished building.

The building was complete enough at the time to show how it would frame Highland Drive.

Sugar Alley will have 186 residences and 16,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

Email Taylor Anderson

Interested in seeing where developers are proposing and building new apartments in Salt Lake, or just want to support a local source of news on what’s happening in your neighborhood? Subscribe to Building Salt Lake.

Posted by Taylor Anderson

Taylor Anderson grew up near Chicago and made his way West to study journalism at the University of Montana. He's been a staff writer for the Chicago Tribune, Bend Bulletin and Salt Lake Tribune. A move from Portland, Oregon, to Salt Lake City opened his eyes to the importance of good urban design for building strong neighborhoods. He lives on the border of the Liberty Wells and Ballpark neighborhoods.