North Temple project at 900 West would add 180 affordable homes

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It seems new corner-lot apartment projects along the West North Temple corridor are being built or proposed almost daily. Transit Station Area (TSA) zoning and Opportunity Zone status give way to numerous types of projects but are especially helpful for affordable housing. 

9Ten West, located at 910 W. North Temple, is a proposed development of 180 units, with 100% being affordable. These units would be rented to people at an overall average AMI of 54.39%. The project has sought approval before and received numerous extensions. However, the latest designs have support and interested partners, according to recent statements by the developers. 

The project will be located on the northwest corner of the intersection of North Temple and 900 W. The lot currently houses a laundromat, Century Cleaning Barn, which would be removed for the new building. 

The existing laundromat, Century Cleaning Barn, proposed to be replaced by the project. Photo by Luke Garrott

The units will range from 250 – 611 sqft, featuring a mix of studios and one-bedrooms. A small retail space is planned for the corner of the first floor, taking roughly 25% of the ground floor not used for parking. 

The building would also include a central clubhouse and solar panels. The plan consists of laundry rooms on each floor for residents but no other amenities outside of this. As this is in a TSA Zone, the project requires very little parking. There would only be 34 parking stalls for the 180 units, or a ratio of .19 stalls/unit. 

This project has been delayed after initially failing to receive RDA funds and then failing to acquire a new Volume Cap Extension from the Private Activity Bond Program (PAB) under the Utah Department of Workforce Services Housing and Community Development division. This program helps distribute tax-exempt bonds for projects around the state with federal funds. 

The project resubmitted designs to the city for review and the PAB in October. The project received approval from the PAB for an extension on the building and for a larger bond due to combat the higher construction costs. They were awarded $21.3 million from the bond, a key component of the project’s financing and success. 

The developer told the PAB Board that they are more optimistic about the ability to build and finance the project than at previous stages. They confirmed to the PAB they have received more interest from contractors and financiers with the new design and proposal. 

This project is close to another new proposal on the West North Temple corridor as the first test for the City’s judgment on implementing their new ground floor activation requirements. This project, however, is all affordable units, which is quite different from some of the others along the corridor.

While these designs and renderings are preliminary, they show major problems with street activation and facade design quality. The Planning Commission may have objections with design elements of the project as it moves through the entitlement stages.

9Ten West is located at a major intersection, one of the most important between 600 W and Redwood Road along the North Temple corridor. This makes this project and its design even more important for city planners as a test of their willingness to follow through with TSA design and activation requirements.

 Development Details

Developer: Great Lakes Capital

Architects: JZW Architects

Civil Engineers: Reeves & Associates Inc

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Email Zeke Peters

Posted by Zeke Peters

Zeke Peters is a dual-masters student at the University of Utah studying Urban Planning and Public Administration. He works as a planner and designer in Salt Lake City. He currently resides in downtown Salt Lake and is from Austin, Minnesota, the birthplace of SPAM.